Santa Fe Institute Collaboration Platform

COMPLEX TIME: Adaptation, Aging, & Arrow of Time

Get Involved!
Contact: Amy P. Chen, Program Manager, amypchen@santafe.edu

A Major Role of the Macrophage in Quantitative Genetic Regulation of Immunoresponsiveness and Antiinfectious Immunity

From Complex Time
Category
General Reference
author-supplied keywords
keywords
authors
title
A Major Role of the Macrophage in Quantitative Genetic Regulation of Immunoresponsiveness and Antiinfectious Immunity
type
journal
year
1984
source
Advances in Immunology
pages
189-234
volume
36
issue
C

Abstract

It is clear today that the immune system is constituted by a coordinated network of perfectly integrated and interacting cells and molecules subject to strict cooperation to ensure the highest possible efficiency in antiinfectious immunity. A simplified scheme of the immune system in higher vertebrates is represented in this chapter. The enzyme equipment of macrophage phagosomes endows these cells with bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity on ingested microorganisms, therefore, constituting the first important mechanism in antiinfectious defense. The metabolic activity of macrophages on engulfed antigens also regulates the specific response of T and B lymphocytes through a complex process of antigen handling and antigen presentation, establishing a sort of symbiotic relationship between lymphocytes and macrophages. There are two essential components in the immune response: one is specific and the other nonspecific. The specific response involves the stereospecific selective recognition. The nonspecific aspect of the immune response includes the handling of the phagocytized antigen and the rate at which the process of multiplication and differentiation of small lymphocytes takes place. The protective effect of specific vaccination is essentially based on immunological memory. The antibody molecules, according to their isotypes, play specialized defensive roles against various types of invading microorganisms, particularly in collaboration with the complement system, inducing bactericidal or opsonizing effects. © 1984, Academic Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

Counts

Citation count From Scopus. Refreshed every 5 days.
Page views
3

Identifiers

  • doi: 10.1016/S0065-2776(08)60902-5 (Google search)
  • issn: 15578445
  • sgr: 0021645736
  • scopus: 2-s2.0-0021645736
  • pui: 403886742

Add a file