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Brain state stability during working memory is explained by network control theory, modulated by dopamine D1/D2 receptor function, and diminished in schizophrenia

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Category
General Reference
author-supplied keywords
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authors
Urs Braun
Anais Harneit
Giulio Pergola
Tommaso Menara
Axel Schaefer
Richard F. Betzel
Zhenxiang Zang
Janina I. Schweiger
Kristina Schwarz
Junfang Chen
Giuseppe Blasi
Alessandro Bertolino
Daniel Durstewitz
Fabio Pasqualetti
Emanuel Schwarz
Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg
Danielle S. Bassett
Heike Tost
title
Brain state stability during working memory is explained by network control theory, modulated by dopamine D1/D2 receptor function, and diminished in schizophrenia
year
2019
source
bioRxiv


Abstract

Dynamical brain state transitions are critical for flexible working memory but the network mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we show that working memory entails brain-wide switching between activity states. The stability of states relates to dopamine D1 receptor gene expression while state transitions are influenced by D2 receptor expression and pharmacological modulation. Schizophrenia patients show altered network control properties, including a more diverse energy landscape and decreased stability of working memory representations.

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